The Job Market vol IV

The 37 highest-paying jobs in America

anesthesiologistChaNaWiT/Shutterstock

C-Suite executives are known for pulling in a pretty penny. But as it turns out, doctors make even more.

That’s right: On average, those sporting scrubs and stethoscopes bring home fatter paychecks than those donning suits and ties, according to the latest US Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates survey.

The survey, which reflects May 2015 salary and employment data gathered from more than 1 million businesses, found that nine of the nation’s top 10 highest-paying occupations are in the medical field.

The best-paying job of all: anesthesiologist.

On average, anesthesiologists in the US earn an average annual salary of $258,100 — which is more than five times what the average American earns.

According to the American Society of Anesthesiologists, these medical doctors are responsible for the safety and well being of patients before, during, and after surgery. In the US, they’re required to complete a four-year undergraduate college degree, four years of medical school, and a four-year anesthesiology residency program. Most anesthesiologists become board certified, and many complete an additional fellowship year of specialty training.

A 2014 physician compensation report by Medscape found that nearly 80% of anesthesiologists spend 40 hours or more per week with patients.

Here are the 37 highest-paying jobs in the US— all of which earn more than $115,000 a year, on average:

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37. Computer and information research scientist

Mean annual pay: $115,580

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 25,510

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 11%

36. Optometrist

Mean annual pay: $115,750

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 35,300

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 27%

35. Judge, magistrate judge, or magistrate

Mean annual pay: $116,100

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 29,020

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): -1%

34. Human resources manager

Mean annual pay: $117,080

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 122,780

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 9%

33. Personal financial adviser

33. Personal financial adviser

Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Mean annual pay: $118,050

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 197,580

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 30%

32. Physicist

32. Physicist

Dana Romanoff / Stringer / Getty Images

Mean annual pay: $118,500

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 15,650

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 7%

31. Air traffic controller

31. Air traffic controller

USACE HQ/Flickr

Mean annual pay: $118,740

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 23,130

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): -9%

30. Pharmacist

30. Pharmacist

Army Medicine/flickr

Mean annual pay: $119,270

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 295,620

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 3%

29. Public relations or fundraising manager

Mean annual pay: $119,390

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 60,380

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 7%

28. General or operations manager

Mean annual pay: $119,460

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 2,145,140

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 6%

27. Compensation and benefits manager

27. Compensation and benefits manager

Moresheth/flickr

Mean annual pay: $121,630

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 15,930

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 6%

26. Law professor

26. Law professor

Tulane Public Relations/flickr

Mean annual pay: $126,230

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 16,430

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 13%

25. Sales manager

Mean annual pay: $130,400

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 364,750

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 5%

24. Financial manager

Mean annual pay: $134,300

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 531,120

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 7%

23. Podiatrist

23. Podiatrist

Tomas Bravo / Reuters

Mean annual pay: $136,180

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 9,500

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 14%

22. Lawyer

Mean annual pay: $136,260

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 609,930

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 6%

21. Airline pilot, copilot, or flight engineer

Mean annual pay: $136,400

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 81,350

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 5%

20. Natural sciences manager

Mean annual pay: $136,570

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 53,450

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 3%

19. Marketing manager

Mean annual pay: $140,660

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 192,890

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 9%

18. Computer and information systems manager

Mean annual pay: $141,000

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 341,250

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 15%

17. Architectural or engineering manager

Mean annual pay: $141,650

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 179,770

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 2%

16. Petroleum engineer

Mean annual pay: $149,590

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 34,600

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 10%

15. Nurse anesthetist

Mean annual pay: $160,250

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 39,410

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 31%

14. Prosthodontist

Mean annual pay: $161,020

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 710

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 18%

According to the BLS, these professionals construct oral prostheses to replace missing teeth to correct natural and acquired deformation of the mouth and jaws; to restore and maintain oral function, such as chewing and speaking; and to improve appearance.

13. Dentist (all other specialties)

13. Dentist (all other specialties)

Scott Olson/Getty

Mean annual pay: $171,040

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 5,550

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 18%

12. Dentist (general)

Mean annual pay: $172,350

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 100,080

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 18%

11. Pediatrician (general)

Mean annual pay: $183,180

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 28,660

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 14%

10. Chief executive

Mean annual pay*: $185,850

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 238,940

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 6%

* The top-earning CEOs in the US earn tens of millions of dollars. Satya Nadella of Microsoft, for instance, raked in $84.3 million in 2014.

9. Family and general practitioner

9. Family and general practitioner

Getty Images

Mean annual pay: $192,120

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 127,430

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 14%

8. Psychiatrist

Mean annual pay: $193,680

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 24,060

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 14%

7. General internist

7. General internist

REUTERS/Joe Skipper

Mean annual pay: $196,520

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 48,920

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 14%

6. Physician or surgeon (all other)

Mean annual pay: $197,700

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 322,740

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 14%

5. Orthodontist

Mean annual pay: $221,390

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 5,410

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 18%

4. Obstetrician and gynecologist

Mean annual pay: $222,400

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 20,090

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 14%

3. Oral and maxillofacial surgeon

3. Oral and maxillofacial surgeon

Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Mean annual pay: $233,900

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 5,000

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 18%

2. Surgeon

Mean annual pay: $247,520

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 41,600

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 14%

1. Anesthesiologist

Mean annual pay: $258,100

Number of people who hold this job in the US: 29,220

Projected growth (2014 – 2024): 14%

 

 

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17 high-paying side jobs you can do in your spare time

photographerIf you love photography, why not get paid to do it in your spare time?Brad Armentor/flickr

Trying to make some extra cash? Have free time you don’t know what to do with? Trying to develop or hone a new skill? You should consider getting a side gig.

FlexJobs, an online service specializing in telecommuting and remote work, recently put together a list of 17 high-paying jobs you can do on the side. To qualify for the list, each job had to be considered “flexible” (and not full time), and had to pay at least double the federal minimum wage of $7.25 an hour, according to the job posting on FlexJobs.

Brie Reynolds, the director of online content for FlexJobs, says “side jobs” are defined as anything part time, including freelance, temporary, short- or long-term, work-from-home, or in-person flexible gigs.

Here’s FlexJobs’ list of high-paying side jobs you might want to consider:

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Curriculum writer

Curriculum writer

Flickr/mer chau

Pay: $50 an hour

Type of flexibility: Temporary, part time

Description: Education professionals with experience in curriculum writing will find a variety of part-time and/or temporary positions to assist educational institutions and organizations with curriculum development, writing, and adaption. These jobs seek people who have excellent teamwork skills and who work well under deadlines.

 

 

City-guide writer

City-guide writer

Reuters/Noah Berger

Pay: $50 to $100 a project

Type of flexibility: Freelance, telecommute

Description: Travel and tourism businesses, as well as real-estate companies, often hire writers to write city and/or neighborhood guides with information about population size, shopping, recreation, culture, entertainment, things to do, climate, transit, and more.

Business consultant

Business consultant

Flickr / Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design

Pay: $48 an hour

Type of flexibility: Part time, telecommute, freelance

Description: Consultants may work with one local business or a variety of nationwide or international companies to handle questions, review processes, and improve performance. Extensive previous management experience is typically required.

 

Project manager

Pay: Up to $43 an hour

Type of flexibility: Part time, freelance

Description: Project managers with previous experience are sometimes hired by clients who need a specific project handled from start to finish. They may oversee the project from idea creation through implementation, coordinate with all participants, track budgets, and troubleshoot issues.

 

Sign-language interpreter

Sign-language interpreter

U.S. Department of Agriculture/flickr

Pay: $36.50 an hour

Type of flexibility: Part time

Description: For those with sign-language skills and a license (which are usually state-sponsored), part-time and freelance contracts are often available. Depending on the employer, you’ll help different populations with hearing impairments communicate with interpretation.

 

Web designer

Web designer

Flickr/Laura D’Alessandro

Pay: $32 an hour

Type of flexibility: Part time, telecommute, temporary, freelance

Description: Web designers are responsible for the graphic-design elements of websites. In these roles, designers create, update, and manage web-design elements, and they need to have design experience as well as excellent client-relations skills.

 

Software developer

Software developer

Tech Hub/flickr

Pay: Up to $30 an hour

Type of flexibility: Flexible schedule, part time, telecommute

Description: Software-development jobs are one of the most in-demand positions available today, and many offer part-time and project-based work. Depending on the gig, you might be updating existing websites, creating new templates, helping to develop new websites and apps, or other related tasks.

Online communications associate

Online communications associate

Shutterstock

Pay: Up to $25 an hour

Type of flexibility: Telecommute, part time

Description: Online-community management positions are a growing area for part-time work. Responsibilities typically include updating web content, managing social media, providing system administration, writing content, and creating reports.

Video reviewer

Video reviewer

Flickr/David Goehring

Pay: $25 an hour

Type of flexibility: Part time, telecommute

Description: For certified teachers in a variety of subject areas, video-reviewer jobs are a part-time way to use your skills and experience for extra income. Video reviewers observe and assess the classroom and instructional performance of teachers from around the country, who send videos of themselves for review.

 

Accountant

Pay: $25 an hour

Type of flexibility: Part time, freelance

Description: Though this isn’t typically thought of as a “side job,” accountants with several years of experience can find part-time work helping different businesses with accounting functions, reporting, and taxes. Some accounting side gigs help businesses and individuals complete their taxes annually or throughout the year, while others are responsible more for daily, weekly, and monthly accounting tasks.

Merchandise coordinator

Merchandise coordinator

Jorge Franganillo/Flickr

Pay: $21 an hour

Type of flexibility: Temporary, freelance, short term

Description: A small amount of merchandising experience is needed for these types of jobs, where you’ll support a merchandising team by maintaining and updating information such as reports, samples, and updates from other teams.

Lead-generation specialist

Lead-generation specialist

Thomson Reuters

Pay: $20 an hour

Type of flexibility: Freelance, part time, telecommute

Description: Lead-generation specialists, also known as appointment setters, typically prospect, qualify, and generate appointments for a variety of companies and business-development teams. Someone with high self-motivation, determination, and communication skills should do well in this type of job.

Freelance product photographer

Pay: Up to $20 an hour

Type of flexibility: Temporary, part time, freelance

Description: Make no mistake — photography side jobs require someone who is highly skilled in photography and related software for editing and retouching photos. Photography experience is almost always required, and graphic design and Photoshop experience is a plus.

Bookkeeper

Bookkeeper

Syda Productions/Shutterstock

Pay: Up to $19 an hour

Type of flexibility: Temporary, flexible schedule, part-time potential

Description: Plenty of part-time bookkeeping jobs exist for both small and large companies. The responsibilities typically usually include using QuickBooks to do reconciliation, accounts payable, accounts receivable, etc. — so at least some experience (and relevant skills) are required.

 

Copy editor/writer

Copy editor/writer

Esperluette/flickr

Pay: Up to $17 an hour

Type of flexibility: Temporary, part time, telecommute

Description: Copy editors and writers can be responsible for the writing, execution, and proofreading of materials across digital and print platforms. Depending on the employer, they may write and edit for marketing materials, editorial content, social media, or other types of material.

Temporary transcript processor

Temporary transcript processor

VFS Digital Design/Flickr

Pay: $15 an hour

Type of flexibility: Part time, temporary

Description: Data-entry jobs like transcript processing are a great side job for people who love to work independently, have solid attention to detail, and enjoy the unique challenges of data entry. Data-entry specialists are needed to input data from a variety of sources into the correct corresponding fields quickly and accurately, and working well under pressure is a must.

 

 

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15 of the toughest interview questions you’ll hear on Wall Street

AP080314014665How would you answer these?Henny Ray Abrams/AP

Interviewing on Wall Street is a notoriously trying process, and job seekers often come up against questions that could send even the calmest candidate into a tailspin.

Despite how ludicrous some of these questions can be, insiders say the worst answer you could give is, “I don’t know.”

How do you think you would answer some of the most difficult interview questions these companies have asked candidates in the past?

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“If you were shrunk to the size of a pencil and put in a blender, how would you get out?”

"If you were shrunk to the size of a pencil and put in a blender, how would you get out?"

Flickr

Asked by Goldman Sachs for an analyst position.

Source: Glassdoor

“You have 100 quarters, 10 heads, 90 tails up in a dark room where you can’t see the quarters. How do you divide them into 2 piles where you have an even amount of heads in each pile?”

"You have 100 quarters, 10 heads, 90 tails up in a dark room where you can't see the quarters. How do you divide them into 2 piles where you have an even amount of heads in each pile?"

Chip Somodevilla/Getty

Asked by JP Morgan Chase for a US Equities Portfolio Management Summer Analyst position.

Source: Glassdoor

“There is a big line of people waiting outside a theater for buying tickets. The theater owner comes out and announces that the first person to have a birthday same as someone standing before him in the line gets a free ticket. Where will you stand to maximize your chance?”

"There is a big line of people waiting outside a theater for buying tickets. The theater owner comes out and announces that the first person to have a birthday same as someone standing before him in the line gets a free ticket. Where will you stand to maximize your chance?"

Flickr/Wayan Vota

Asked by Morgan Stanley for a Quantitative Analyst position.

Source: Glassdoor

“Why did we choose you to come to our final round interview?”

Asked by Bank of America for a sales and trading analyst position.

Source: Glassdoor

“Why haven’t you asked me about compensation yet?”

Asked by Deutsche Bank for a investment banking summer analyst position.

Source: Glassdoor

“What exact number will the S&P be at in a year and why?”

"What exact number will the S&P be at in a year and why?"

Reuters/Arko Datta

Asked by Credit Suisse for a sales and trading intern position.

Source: Glassdoor

“If you were to get this job and then look back in five or ten years, why wouldn’t you think it was a waste of your time?”

Asked by Citigroup for an analyst position.

Source: Glassdoor

“A trader is calling asking for your approval. Its 7:30 a.m., no one else is in the department yet, and it’s urgent. What do you do?”

"A trader is calling asking for your approval. Its 7:30 a.m., no one else is in the department yet, and it's urgent. What do you do?"

Flickr/Victor1558

Asked by Barclays for an analyst position.

Source: Glassdoor

“What’s your opinion about Adolf Hitler?”

"What's your opinion about Adolf Hitler?"

Bundesarchiv

Asked by Goldman Sachs for an operations analyst position.

Source: Glassdoor

“I don’t get it. Why are you here at this interview?”

"I don't get it. Why are you here at this interview?"

Fezza 🙂 via Flickr

Asked by UBS for a financial advisor position.

Source: Glassdoor

“What do you know about the Patriot Act?”

"What do you know about the Patriot Act?"

AP

Asked by HSBC for an AML analyst position.

Source: Glassdoor

“How would you value a hot dog stand in Midtown Manhattan?”

"How would you value a hot dog stand in Midtown Manhattan?"

Lulu Vision/Flickr

Asked by Bank of America for a Summer investment banking analyst position.

Source: Glassdoor

“What is the single most attribute that makes you successful?”

"What is the single most attribute that makes you successful?"

Milles Studio/Shutterstock

Asked by Citigroup for a vice president position.

Source: Glassdoor

“How many golf balls could fit on a 737 jet?”

"How many golf balls could fit on a 737 jet?"

Boeing

Asked by Jefferies & Co. for an analyst position.

Source: Glassdoor

“How many square feet of pizza is eaten in the US each year?”

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13 of the weirdest interview questions you’ll hear in Silicon Valley

  • Jun. 19, 2015, 10:48 AM

Do you know how many gas stations are in San Jose?Flickr/acearchie

Silicon Valley is no stranger to weird behavior.

So it comes as no surprise that the home of numerous tech giants would produce some of the strangest interview questions out there.

To find these odd queries, we sifted through hundreds of reviews on Glassdoor submitted by people who interviewed in Silicon Valley in the past year.

Below are some of the weirdest ones we found.

View As: One Page Slides

“Why is the earth round?”

NASA

Asked by Twitter for a software engineer position.

Source: Glassdoor

“You’re wearing a nametag, tell me what you think about it.”

Daniel Goodman/Business Insider

Asked by Yahoo for an associate product manager position.

Source: Glassdoor

“Choose a city and estimate how many piano tuners operate a business there.”

A piano tuner at work. Flickr/seljes

Asked by Google for a project manager position.

Source: Glassdoor

“How many gas stations are in San Jose?”

Pixabay

Asked by Adobe for a quality engineering management position.

Source: Glassdoor

“How much do you charge to wash every window in Seattle?”

Flickr / Howard Ignatius

Asked by Facebook for an online sales operations position.

Source: Glassdoor

“If you woke up and had 2,000 unread emails and could only answer 300 of them, how would you choose which ones to answer?”

Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design/flickr

Asked by Dropbox for a rotation program position.

Source: Glassdoor

“What would you do if you were the one survivor in a plane crash?”

Pixabay

Asked by Airbnb for a trust and safety investigator position.

Source: Glassdoor

“How many children are born every day?”

pixydust8605 via Flickr

Asked by Apple for a global supply manager position.

Source: Glassdoor

“Design a spice rack for the blind.”

Flickr / sara marlowe

Asked by Intel for a hardware engineer position.

Source: Glassdoor

“What kind of tree would you be?”

Flickr/Rod Waddington

Asked by Cisco for a senior technical writer position.

Source: Glassdoor

“If you had a choice between two superpowers (being invisible or flying), which would you choose?”

Erich Ferdinand/flickr

Asked by Microsoft for a high-level product lead/evangelist position.

Source: Glassdoor

“What is your experience with working with millennials?”

Mark Davis/Getty Images

Asked by LinkedIn for a contingent workforce specialist position.

Source: Glassdoor

“If you went door-to-door notifying everybody about the environment and somebody said that the government can take care of it, what would you tell them?”

REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

Asked by Yelp for a field director position.

Source: Glassdoor

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